White House: Trump Will Sign Repeal Of Obama-Era Internet Privacy Rules

Lynne Hanson
April 10, 2017

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that effectively blocks a 2016 internet privacy rule from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) called, "Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunication Services". But on Thursday, more than 40 Senators, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., signed a letter urging President Trump to veto the bill on behalf of consumers, the Huffington Post reported.

The regulations were approved by the FCC in the Obama Administration, and were meant to go into effect this year.

Be prepared to bid adieu to your online privacy. Given the House barely passed the bill 215-205, with 15 Republicans crossing the aisle to join Democrats in opposition, and the Senate passed the bill 50-48, an override would be unlikely.

Thanks to House Republicans, internet service providers can sell your personal information to advertisers without your permission. The White House had earlier said that the new USA president strongly supported the repeal of the rules.

That would include your browser history, data from your apps, and geo-location.

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Opponents of the privacy rules argued it would place an undue burden on broadband providers while leaving large internet companies like Facebook and Google free to collect user data without asking permission.

But rather than apply similar protections to more businesses, the Republican-controlled Congress voted to scrap the rules entirely. Over the last two months, they've voted to repeal more than a dozen Obama-era regulations in the name of curbing government overreach.

"It totally wipes out privacy protections for consumers on the internet", Democratic Representative Anna Eshoo said on the floor. "Just last week, I bought underwear on the internet", he said. Websites, like Facebook and Google, use opt-out policies.

And, because of the current legal landscape, the Federal Trade Commission is already barred from policing Internet service providers. Republicans and industry groups have blasted that discrepancy, saying it was unfair and confusing for consumers.

Other reports by TheDailyFarc

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